User login

May First People Link

A couple VCL changes when upgrading to Varnish 3

The error messages Varnish provides are very informative.

tail -f /var/log/varnish/current

A Movement Cannot be Owned

Seth Godin writes:

A movement has an emotional heart. A movement might use an organization, but it can replace systems and people if they disappear. Movements are more likely to cause widespread change, and they require leaders, not managers. The internet, it turns out, is a movement, and every time someone tries to own it, they fail.

Server blocking someone who should have access? Try etc/hosts.allow

Blocked and receiving an error "ssh: connect to host" "port 22: Connection refused", Stefan added the IP address where this was not working to the hosts allow file, and explained the system.

There's two relevant files: /etc/hosts.allow and /etc/hosts.deny

/etc/hosts.deny is updated by the denyhosts package based on attacks and suspicious behaviour. it can be overridden by /etc/hosts.allow

An entry consists of a service, such as ssh, and a number of IP addresses.

Cron on Agaric's MayFirst servers

The cron jobs for each web site are created as the user associated with that web site: the user accesses it with the crontab command

For instance:

su exampleuser
crontab -l

To see what cron jobs that user has, which should contain the "drush -r /var/local/drupal/exampleuser/web cron", where exampleuser is the site project name (which may or may not be identical to the username, but is in any case owned by the user).

The admin (root) can see them all in /var/spool/cron/crontabs

grep -h \* /var/spool/cron/crontabs/*

Kerberos user creation and password changes for Agaric test sites

Everyday use

You can change your password at

Or when logged in to with kpasswd (first type your current password, and then your new one, twice).

Initial setup of a user via the command line

These commands can be run on Agaric's test server,

First, to see if a username already exists, you can list them with listprincs:

Create a new user on Agaric's test server at MayFirst/PeopleLink

Creating a public key

The user to be added (we'll call him Andrew) types this in his terminal:


Then he sends his public key to the person acting as sysadmin at the moment. As an e-mail attachment is fine. For users not used to the command line it can be hard to find the public key in a hidden .ssh folder, but it is possible to use scp to put it on a server both the user and the acting sysadmin have access to.

Adding the user to the server

The sysadmin then logs into the test server and uses standard Debian commands:

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